• Pencil Plug Fishing Lure, #379

    There is only 1 item left in stock.

      Native American Made and hand painted fishing lures. Artist David Brodie has Native American heritage as a Saginaw Chippewa Tribe member, infusing a painting and design style that he feels is Native American.

        There are four steps to get to the main coat of paint. The naked wood is painted with gray primer, and then the base color is added. If the lure will have a yellow belly, he’ll paint the whole lure yellow. If he wants the lure to have scaling, he’ll clip on a mesh net, and paint black or another color over that. After scaling he’ll add detail painting, whether eyes or Native American styling. He calls this adding “character” to the lure. To him, this is what makes them unique. The lure is finished with a coat of varnish, and finally hooks and wires are added. He can make 10 lures in an eight-hour day, and he has several lures at different steps in the process on his bench, mingling in the sawdust and power tools.

     Brodie’s work has been used as standard for measuring the value of lures made in Michigan in the Encyclopedia of Fishing Lures Made in North America, volume 3. When he sells lures they cost between $35 and $300 depending on whether it’s a lure or a decoy. Many times he’ll trade for another lure he wants.